Excellent Resources for Seniors

The Transition to Retirement

MusingsThanks to Boomers, the definition of "retirement" has changed dramatically and completely. Many Boomers fully expect to keep working well beyond the traditional retirement age, and others look at retirement as not any kind of termination point, but rather as another phase of life. An article appearing on the excellent website, NextAvenue.org, puts retirement into perspective by discussing 7 tips for transitioning into retirement. The article is sponsored by Acts Retirement-Life Communities.

One of the key points made in the article is that it takes time -- probably more time than you realize -- to move into retirement: "It could take months or it could take a few years for you to finally feel comfortable in your new skin. It’s completely natural and understandable for this transition to take a long time. After all, you were involved in the world of work for decades and those habits won’t melt away instantly." Another good point is to view retirement as the beginning of something new, fresh and exciting: "People live much longer than they used to. That means retirement is longer, too. Make the most it by finding a new purpose, setting new goals and generally broadening your horizons in every way you can imagine possible."

I can attest to the accuracy of this advice. I "rewired" in my mid-fifties by leaving a professional career and needed time to transition away from commuting and working in a traditional business setting. My wife and I relocated to a smaller city with a more temperate climate. We decided to start a small service business together and run it for a period of time, which turned out to be about seven years. (We wrote a book about our experience, Let's Make Money, Honey: The Couple's Guide to Starting a Service Business) We always intended to operate it as a transitional business until we were ready to stop working full-time. I then became a part-time independent writer and sometime marketing consultant, in combination with nonprofit volunteering. This transition has been a good one for me. I am very happy working when I want and managing my own schedule. My wife stays busy with nonprofit volunteering and as her mother's primary caretaker.

Obviously, your way of handling this transition may be different from mine, but I do agree it generally takes longer than you think to feel comfortable with this new phase of life. I am fortunate in that I can write both for fun (this blog, for example) and for income, and I know not every Boomer has this luxury. Read the 7 tips in the article -- it will help you gain some insight into transitioning to retirement.

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